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mild-bloom:

Bedroom for the anon


Some days in late August at home are like this, the air thin and eager like this, with something in it sad and nostalgic and familiar…

thegreatgracie:

Books, books, books

thegreatgracie:

Books, books, books


futurejournalismproject:

Not Your Ordinary Bookstore

Argentina’s El Ataneo Grand Splendid opened as a theater in 1919, later became a cinema and is now a bookstore.

Images: El Ataneo Grand Splendid, via Atlas Obscura.


fernweh [feyrn-vey]
(noun) This wonderful, untranslatable German word describes the feeling of homesickness for a far away land, a place you have never visited. Do not confuse this with the word, wanderlust; Fernweh is much more profound; it is the feeling of an unsatisfied urge to escape and discover new places, almost a sort of sadness. You miss a place you have never experienced, as opposed to lusting over it or desiring it like wanderlust. You are seeking freedom and self-discovery, but not a particular home. There are too many feelings wrapped up into this wonderful, little word. Remember, the world is your home!   (via wordsnquotes)

theparisreview:

Where are Ernest Hemingway and Mark Twain now? The fourth in a week-long series of illustrations by Jason Novak, captioned by Eric Jarosinski.

theparisreview:

Where are Ernest Hemingway and Mark Twain now? The fourth in a week-long series of illustrations by Jason Novak, captioned by Eric Jarosinski.


lapitiedangereuse:

* Vladimir Nabokov, teaching his students how to read Kafka, pointed out to them that the insect into which Gregor Samsa is transformed is in fact a winged beetle, an insect that carries its wings under its armoured back, and that if Gregor had only discovered them, he would have been able to escape. And then Nabokov added: “Many a Dick and a Jane grow up like Gregor, unaware that they too have wings and can fly.”

lapitiedangereuse:

* Vladimir Nabokov, teaching his students how to read Kafka, pointed out to them that the insect into which Gregor Samsa is transformed is in fact a winged beetle, an insect that carries its wings under its armoured back, and that if Gregor had only discovered them, he would have been able to escape. And then Nabokov added: “Many a Dick and a Jane grow up like Gregor, unaware that they too have wings and can fly.”


I think it is all a matter of love; the more you love a memory the stronger and stranger it becomes
 Vladimir Nabokov (via feellng)

blankonblank:

A chronological record of Prince’s hairstyles from 1978 to 2013.  #tbt via illustrator Gary Card.

blankonblank:

A chronological record of Prince’s hairstyles from 1978 to 2013.  #tbt via illustrator Gary Card.